AEROSOL RESEARCH GROUP

DEPARTMENT OF MECHANICAL AND MATERIALS ENGINEERING     •     2390 SOUTH YORK STREET     •     DENVER, CO 80208

AEROSOL GROUP

    INSTRUMENTS

    PEOPLE

    MISSIONS

    AIRCRAFT

    DATA ANALYSIS

    PUBLICATIONS

DATA ANALYSIS


The University of Denver’s Aerosol Research Group has made aerosol measurements from aircraft platforms  in the stratosphere and the troposphere.  These data have been analyzed to study the origins, fates and impacts of the atmospheric aerosol.  As can be seen from our list of publications, we have enjoyed extensive collaborations with colleagues measuring related parameters and species. Specific topics include:

Instrument Design and Performance:  The function and performance of the low pressure condensation particle counters, optical particle counters, low-turbulence inlet and passive, near-isokinetic inlet have been described.  Comparisons with lidar and satellite measurements have been done.

Characteristics and Impacts of Volcanic Aerosol:  Number concentrations and size distributions were measured in the stratosphere following the eruptions of El Chichon and Pinatubo.  New particle formation, optical extinction and heterogeneous chemistry have been described.

Stratospheric Dynamics:  Number concentrations of sub-micron particles (measured with low-pressure condensation nuclei counters) were measured to study stratospheric-troposphere exchange and transport across the jet stream and into the polar vortex.

Ozone Depletion:  We have studied the role of aerosol surface in the chemistry of the lower stratosphere.

Cloud-Aerosol Interactions: Tropical, subtropical and mid-latitude cirrus clouds and their interaction with particles have been studied.  The formation of Polar Stratospheric Clouds have been observed and related to the thermodynamic and chemical situations.  Cloud-aerosol interactions are a critical factor in climate.

Aerosol Dynamics: The processes that sustain the non-volcanic, stratospheric aerosol layer have been observed and reported.  The conditions leading to the formation of new particles in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere have been reported.

Air Quality and Long Range Transport of Pollutants:  The DU Aerosol Group has contributed to NOAA studies of pollution in Houston and transport of pollutants.

Dust and Soot in the Atmosphere:  Inlets designed and operated by the DU Aerosol Group have facilitated the measurement of dust and soot in the atmosphere.  Both are important in climate.

 

 

  Updated August 9, 2011

Contact: jwilson@du.edu